• Mel Hulbert

What’s in the Sky - September 2021

Moon Phase:

New Moon 7th

First Quarter 14th

Full Moon 21st

Last Quarter 29th


Spring Equinox: 23rd


Planets:

Evening Sky

Mercury is low in the western sky after sunset in the constellation Virgo. This month is one of the best for observing Mercury as the planet remains visible after the end of twilight, with the darker skies making it easier to find.

Venus is in the western sky after sunset. The brilliantly shining planet is in the constellation Virgo for the first half of the month before moving into Libra.

Jupiter & Saturn are high in the eastern sky after sunset in the constellation Capricornus.

Worth a Look:

5th & 6th: Venus is less than two degrees from Spica, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo.

9th: The waxing crescent Moon is slightly above and to the right (northwest) of Mercury. This is a great opportunity for wide-field photographers. The crescent Moon and Mercury with the horizon below and Venus above will make a wonderful widefield image.

10th: The waxing crescent Moon is slightly above and to the right (northwest) of the brilliantly shining planet, Venus. Another great opportunity for wide-field photographers to capture Mercury, Venus and the Moon.

17th: The waxing gibbous Moon is below or to the right (southeast) of the ringed planet, Saturn.

18th: The waxing gibbous Moon is beside or to the right (southeast) of the largest planet in our Solar System, Jupiter.

21st: Mercury and Spica, the brightest star in the constellation of Virgo, are separated by one and a half degrees.


You can download a star map for September here.

Clear Skies!



References:

Dawes G., Northfield P., Wallace K. (2020). Astronomy 2021 Australia, Quasar Publishing.

Lomb, N. (2020). 2021 Australasian sky guide. Ultimo, NSW: Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences Media.