• Mel Hulbert

What’s in the Sky - April 2021

Moon Phase:

Last Quarter 4th

New Moon 12th

First Quarter 20th

Full Moon 27th


Australian Daylight Savings Time Ends on the 4th. Remember to put your clocks back an hour.


Planets:

Evening Sky

Mars is in the northwestern sky after sunset in the constellation of Taurus. The red planet moves into Gemini on the 24th. Morning Sky

Saturn is visible high in the eastern morning sky in the constellation Capricornus. Saturn will remain in Capricornus until 2023.

Jupiter is also high in the eastern morning sky below Saturn. It starts the month in the constellation Capricornus and moves into Aquarius on the 26th.

Mercury is low in the eastern sky at the start of the month but by the 12th has slipped below the horizon.

Venus: remains too close to the Sun to be seen this month.


Worth a Look:

7th: The waning crescent Moon is below and slightly to the right (south) of the ringed planet Saturn. With Jupiter below and slightly to the east of Moon, it is a great opportunity for widefield photographers. 8th: The waning crescent Moon is below and to the right (south) of Jupiter. A good opportunity for widefield photographers

11th: A slender waning crescent Moon is visible about mercury. With Mercury very low in the sky, a clear view to the eastern horizon will be essential.

17th: The waxing crescent Moon and the red planet, Mars meet in the western evening sky. About two degrees separates the two with Mars above and slightly to the right (north) of the Moon. A good opportunity for widefield photographers.

27th: Mars passes close to the open star cluster M35. With the red planet now close to the western horizon after sunset, binoculars and a clear western horizon will be essential to see the pair.


You can download a star map for April here.

Clear Skies!




References:

Dawes G., Northfield P., Wallace K. (2020). Astronomy 2021 Australia, Quasar Publishing.

Lomb, N. (2020). 2021 Australasian sky guide. Ultimo, NSW: Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences Media.